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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 110-115

Supportive systems needed for the functioning of people with traumatic brain injury: An exploratory study


1 Department of Psychology, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, UK
2 Department of Behavioural Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
3 Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong

Correspondence Address:
Daniel Kwasi Ahorsu
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom
Hong Kong
Emmanuel Sarku
Department of Psychology, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, Reading
UK
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/shb.shb_13_21

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Introduction: People with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been found to have significant cognitive challenges which negatively impact their psychosocial life. This calls for efficient supportive systems and coping mechanisms to enable them to function in the society. This study, therefore, examined the (1) supportive systems that affect people with TBI and (2) essential coping mechanisms for psychosocial activities among people with TBI. Methods: A total of forty participants with a mean age of 35.30 (standard deviation = 11.90) years, mostly males (70%) and married (55%) were recruited for this cross-sectional study. They completed measures on TBI severity, coping strategies, social support, religious coping activities, and psychosocial activities. Results: There were significant interrelationships between coping strategies, social support, religious coping activities, psychosocial activities, and severity of TBI. Coping strategies, religious coping, and psychosocial activities were the supportive systems that affect people with TBI. Coping strategies was the only factor that affects the psychosocial activities of people with TBI. Conclusion: Based on these findings, different supportive systems may be needed for different functional abilities of people with TBI. Hence, clinicians may have to individualize assessment in order to offer bespoke support systems needed for improvement.


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